The Indian Adventure: Mirakle Couriers

Before working with the third and final social enterprise, I had the opportunity to meet some of Senior Management Team from RBS India, who had worked with RBS in the UK to recruit and deliver individuals to work with these high potential social enterprises on this consultancy project. I also had the chance to meet the Directorate of India’s UKTI, again providing a valuable insight into how business is done in India and how quickly the economy is emerging and growing in line with the UK.

The third venture was Mirakle Couriers. Mirakle Couriers is a delivery company which only employs deaf people. In India, there is still a view, which would be considered dated in the UK, that people with a disability are socially inferior. For obvious reasons this can mean that people who are born deaf never have the opportunity to get employment and the opportunity to develop real life skills and live normal lives in this sense. By basing their service on this group of people, they buck the trend and have already seen some fantastic results, both from the employees and from those using the courier service.

Through the use of writing boards, employees can deliver packages in the same way as any other courier service, but with the added benefit of breaking down this social perception, enhancing the employability of their staff and removing the social isolation which can occur with this group. In fact, the service has been so successful that many clients believe that the personal service offered by Mirakle Couriers outweighs that of the major players in the sector.

There were certainly synergies between the challenges faced by Mirakle Couriers and the other social enterprises I had worked with in India – in fact, many UK social enterprises encounter the same issue; namely, that of branding. There is often a difficult trade-off between promoting an organisation’s social values and the underlying theory of change which provides the foundations for the enterprise and the quality of product or service. Often the additional social element can create a competitive advantage from other competitors in that sector, although similarly it can be a deterrent. In Mirakle Courier’s case, given the social perceptions of people with disabilities in India, many potential clients wouldn’t use the service for this reason. However, all those who used the service felt that it was an efficient, personable and reliable service.

In general terms, given how strongly the Founders can feel about their social mission, promoting the enterprise purely based on the quality of the product or service delivered rather than the social aims can be challenging. But in this case, as in many others, this would increase the demand for the service, which in turn contributes towards the social objectives; the more people who use the service, the more deaf people they can employ and the further this group can enhance their skills. Ultimately this is what was suggested, and then worked on with Mirakle Couriers.

This topic has created much debate in the social enterprise arena, but what Company Directors must ask themselves is: do they want to deliver as much of their social good as possible, even if it means not fully promoting their cause, or do they want to fully advertise their social objectives and attempt to increase awareness for the issue, even if it means lower sales?

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